Photo credit: Pixaby.com In the summer, or even fall, winter and spring in some parts of the world, heat can be a dangerous element in the outdoors. According to the Centers For Disease Control, 7,415 deaths in the United States were associated with exposure to excessive natural heat from 1999 to 2010. That’s an average of 618 per year! Don’t become a statistic and use these tips to keep cool in hot weather. 1. Avoid The Sun Follow the lead of animals. If you don’t see any snakes or iguanas or squirrels or birds, it’s probably because they are hiding…
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A recent trip to the Grand River in Ontario confirmed what I should have taken as an article of faith — it's hopper time. Hopper pattern flies are a must for summertime trout. Unfortunately, this occurred to me too late, after witnessing a brown trout that had to be somewhere north of 20 inches, clear the water in a violent, slashing rise. Two things were unusual about this. First, it was a ridiculously hot day, which is why we had just spent all our time achieving a mediocre level of success by dragging tiny nymphs though a deep shaded pool and…
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I know when you hear the words "fishing the flats" you are thinking somewhere tropical, but Lake Superior has its own version. The flats on Superior are opposite of what you would think of fishing in the salt. Instead of being in just a few feet of crystal clear water, the Superior flats are 100 feet deep and turquoise in color as far as you can see. On the southeast side of Madeline Island, fishermen frequent the flats in search of lake trout. While the action on the flats seems to start around July, the best fishing for Lakers continues…
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Rivers, which make up a significant bass-fishing resource in our country, function differently than reservoirs or natural lakes. River bass are subject to the regular rises and falls in flow, which plays a huge factor in where they locate within a river. When the flow is up, which it has been all summer on my home waters of western Pennsylvania, it pushes bass close to the bank. And when they are tucked tight to shore, in water that is most likely murky, I've found that nothing catches them like a spinnerbait. Here are a few tips and items in regard…
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For fly anglers, as we enter the long dry conditions of late July and early August, fishing your favorite streams and rivers can become exceedingly difficult. This difficulty is due to the low water conditions and abundance of insects to satisfy hungry fish. Fly anglers need to be able to turn from their time trusted nymphs and streamers techniques and go with a more radical approach, flamboyant hopper patterns. As far as fly fishing is concerned, there is not many more exciting ways to catch big browns than with topwater flies. And better yet, big browns seem to have a…
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Flukes — brand name anglers often use to describe one basic style of soft stickbaits — are highly effective river walleye baits when water temperatures rise into the mid 50s and beyond. Feeding fish are found in surprisingly shallow water, often a foot or two deep, in strong current. Less active walleyes often hold in main channel areas, deeper places that still exhibit a fair amount of current. In both situations, the judicious use of soft stickbaits is a top summertime ploy. When to Toss Flukes Fluke-style baits excel when targeting active fish feeding in shallow areas with a fair amount of…
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4 Weird Baits That Catch Catfish

Thursday, July 31 2014 3:00 pm - for Catfishing
Old "Mr. Whiskers" is one of America's favorite fish, both in terms of angling quality and cuisine. They are prolific and can be caught all across the country. And few fish can match the delicate flavor of a firm catfish filet. All species of catfish can be caught on a variety of baits ranging from goldfish to rotten chicken carcasses. Large earthworms are a favorite bait in many regions. However, if you get caught short of bait, look in your refrigerator or bathroom. Or, if you are outside, look for a couple of plants that can provide bait. Try these…
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    Walleye rivers of all sorts feature piers, vertical structures where walleyes collect during the summer months. Bridge piers, which often funnel the river's current, are the most common. Typically depressions are formed at the base of bridge piers during high water events; woody snags also wrap around the structures. It's common on larger, navigable rivers for sections of riverbank — particularly near industrial sites — to be stabilized by way of corrugated steel walls. In some instances shore anglers can gain access to such spots. Add to this the many fishing piers that exist in combination with hydro-electric stations on…
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Wet flies — and the use of them — have become somewhat of a lost art in the realm of fly fishing for trout. Which is unfortunate, as wet flies are both easy to fish and productive. So when my friend Mark mentioned to me that he'd had a good day on a well-known central Pennsylvania trout stream while "swinging" soft hackle wet flies, I convinced him he should make a return visit, with me along. Why Wet Flies? Soft hackle wet flies are an example of simplicity, often no more than a subtle body tied of silk, with a light wrap…
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Biologists in state fisheries agencies have stated that underutilized catfish populations exist in smaller creeks and rivers from Virginia to Texas. Catfish can live in any water but cold streams at high elevations. These fish are adaptable to a broad range of current and turbidity conditions, thus their abundance. Also, they are extremely hardy, and they will eat virtually anything organic.   Smaller creeks and rivers from Virginia to Tennessee are thriving with catfish. Joe B. Sweeney of Lobelville, Tenn., should have a business card that says "river rat, specializing in catching catfish." The retired angler spends his days on…
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